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Type 34 Registry member blogs and build threads

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Posted by on in Uncategorized
I guess no ones around anymore... not too many posts. I know I haven't been around for a while. I thought this place would have a lot of people on it. well just taking a look to see whats new around here. Keep me posted. hehehehe   Einstein...

Posted by on in Uncategorized
  I joined the type 34 registry years ago, like maybe around 1993 or there about. I found and purchased my type in 1978, prior to 99% of the VW dealerships knowing this model existed. I found one person in the Chico Dealership who took the time to examine old "Micro fishes" and located many NOS parts across the USA. I purchased a LOT of these NOS parts, including the LAST NOS PADDED DASH, which I had to drive from Lacy Washington to Chico to pick up because the dealership was afraid to ship it to me. I had my Type 34 looking really PRIMO by 1984. I quit working on it about that time, and drove it almost daily until 1987. From this date until now it hasn't been driven more than maybe 1500 miles. I am now interested in completing it's restoration, so am back into dressing her back...

Posted by on in NOS parts
It's been a long time since I've made any progress on the Ghia. 2012 has been an overwhelming year — turned 50, got married, started a new job, currently in the 9th month of what was supposed to be a 5-month house addition/renovation project — so the car (and blog) have had to take a back seat. I'm looking forward to getting back to the Ghia soon, but in the meantime I've been picking up some NOS parts occasionally, including this collection of bearings, bushings, and seals for early Type 3 front beams. Many of the front beam parts for my Ghia are unique to the first year or so of production (of course), so later Type 3 parts won't fit. Because of their scarcity I've been wanting to acquire NOS front beam parts for a long time, so when Bert van der Jeught offered a set on The Samba I...

Posted by on in Events
Some highlights from this year's Classic Weekend. The usual great events, cool cars and people, 58 barndoor buses, Snorkelstang, and a bottle of Patrón courtesy of 1500 Club member Dave Whittick of Canada. Not too shabby. [gallery] ...

Posted by on in reproduction parts
It's the Ghia's 50th birthday today. I bought it a gift -- a reproduction '62 Ghia badge -- and toasted the occasion with a glass of Duvel. Yes, I know it's not a German beer, but the brewery is less than 200 miles from Osnabrück, so that's close enough for me. This summer the restoration project will continue. ...

Posted by on in Events
On Sunday morning we all met again at the Borradori Garage for breakfast. A casual observer would assume this had been planned all along, but Terri Reay only came up with the idea of a tri-tip and egg burrito breakfast at about 10pm the night before. Everyone pitched in and it came together perfectly. After breakfast and some cleanup everyone began to go their separate ways. Our Los Angeles caravan left at around noon and other than David Aveson's squareback having a relapse of its fuel injection trouble the drive was smooth and uneventful (we had to put it behind Gizmo Bob's truck and Dave drove Bob's notchback the rest of the way back). When Jack Fisher got back to San Diego he texted that his total weekend mileage was 950! I figure I did about 700. What a great weekend of driving! [gallery] Many more photos from the weekend can...

Posted by on in Events
On Saturday morning everyone met again at the garage -- everyone meaning the 11 cars that had cruised up the coast on Friday and 9 more, including a caravan from Orange County. We headed up into the hills above Cayucos for a beautiful 30-mile drive through the countryside. Other than one car with a malfunctioning injection system, being hassled a little by the Five-O, and a stretch of rough road that vexed the lowered cars a bit, the drive was perfect. We then showed up at the Cambria Oktoberfest, where Type 3s totally dominated the all-German car show. Later in the afternoon we all headed back to the garage for a Santa Maria-style tri-tip barbeque thanks to grillmaster Tom Reay, Type 3-shaped desserts (!), and a champagne toast to the Type 3's 50th birthday. Perfect ending to a perfect day. [gallery] ...

Posted by on in Events
This last weekend was the 50 Years of the Type 3 weekend on California's central coast. It was an incredible 4 days of Type 3 driving centered around the historic Borradori Garage in the beach town of Cayucos. 21 Type 3s (8 notchbacks, 3 squarebacks, 4 fastbacks and 6 Type 34s) and about 50 people attended. A great time was had by all. Here are some shots from Friday. We drove up Highway 1 from Cayucos to the lower part of Big Sur and back, about a 120 mile round trip. [gallery] ...

Posted by on in engine overhaul
I got my engine back from the builder recently and this weekend I got it reassembled and reinstalled after some parts sourcing, rust treatment and painting. I was preparing to put the engine back in when I was stopped by this: A couple of months ago I saw that my Ghia's swingaxle boots needed replacement. I had a pair of old stock boots on the shelf so I put them on and forgot about it. They were in their factory sealed bags until I installed them, experienced about 15 miles of use, and had no exposure to excessive heat or UV rays, but in two months they're in worse shape than the ones they replaced. Luckily I had the foresight to buy a new pair of VW OEM boots the last time I was at Bill and Steve's, so I was able to replace them without yet another trip to the...

Posted by on in Exterior
With the headliner and rear parcel shelf now installed the next things to get installed are the trims that fit around the side windows. The whole area has an extruded aluminium trim that sits in a rubber channel, this fits from the base of the A Pillar, along the roof, down the rear of the C pillar and back along the bottom of the aperture to the door opening. The trim section helps to hold the roof lining in position and finishes the roof lining off. I had previously sent the aluminium trims out to be polished.  Normally these trim sections are plated with a bright finish similar to anodizing (but not the same), however I decided to polish them which gives a shinier finish. The trims were then waxed to prevent oxidation. There are a few articles in the library about trim refinishing and from memory at least one Registry...

Posted by on in General
As with assembling most things, whether an Ikea flat pack, or a classic car, the order in which things are put together is pretty important. This is especially true of the Type 34 interior. The interior trim is installed in such a way that each part must be fitted in the correct order. The headlining is the first part in this jigsaw puzzle, it fits underneath the front and rear screen rubbers and also the side trim around the door aperture and so needs to be installed first. Next is the rear parcel shelf. This also fits underneath the rear screen rubber, much the same way that the headlining does. My rear parcel shelf was too badly warped to be reused, but I had carefully stored it for use as a pattern. Unfortunately I could not find it, and so had to make one from scratch. My guess is that somewhere...

Posted by on in General
It's been a few weeks since I posted a progress update,  not because I've not done anything, but simply as I've been too busy to be able to to spare the time to blog about it. If you've been checking my photo stream you would have noticed that I did manage to upload some pictures of what I've been up to and you would have noticed that the build is ticking along nicely. The main work that has been carried out since my last update is the installation of the headlining. I had originally booked this into the same trim shop that trimmed my seats, but after several postponements, I got fed up with waiting for them and decided to do it myself. I had already purchased the headlining material when I ordered my carpet set from Spirit of the 50's this must have been some 10 years ago and unfortunately...

Posted by on in Engine
If like me you have wondered how or where you can mount the trigger wheel for your EFI Type 3 engine, well ponder no longer, the answer is here :D I stumbled across this thread over at the Samba, where supersuk outlined an idea to make a trigger wheel that mounted directly to the front of the fan. A stroke of genius really, and simple too. In a previous blog post I had already considered somehow using the fan as the trigger wheel (it kinda looks like a trigger wheel) but never got past the fact that the VR sensor would not work on the cast aluminium. The solution is to make a trigger wheel that has no centre and can be bolted to the front of the fan. Just ensure that it follows the form of the fan, thus not impeding the airflow. A head smacking moment really - one...

Posted by on in Brakes
Rawhide references aside, this weekend broaches yet another milestone in the build. For the past 5 or so years the car has sat on axle stands whilst I tinkered about with different suspension setups, but now, after deciding to postpone my plans for the crazy suspension and fitting a stock (ish) IRS setup, it finally stands on it's own four wheels again. After experiencing a few hiccups over the past few weeks, I must admit to being a little disheartened with the build. The first issue I came across was having to finally admit defeat with the wheels I had chosen and source a set with a greater offset, this was the topic of conversation for my last blog. Well, since then, I have had more bad news. Last week I dropped off the flywheel, crank, fan etc to the engine balancers to get balanced, only to be told a few...

Posted by on in engine overhaul
I saw this pair of rebuilt early 1500 heads for sale and thought I'd better get them while I could. These don't come along every day. 311 101 371 heads have 40-horse style straight intake ports and were only used through June 1962. The date code on the casting appears to indicate December 7, 1961. The heads were apparently rebuilt many years ago and they still retain their long rocker studs. Most of the remaining 40-horse and early 1500 heads out there have long ago been converted to short rocker studs due to the fact that long studs can sometimes loosen and fail to hold torque. Also, unlike short studs, with long studs valve clearances tend to get tighter as the engine warms up, so there's less margin for error when adjusting the valves — a tight valve having much more potential to cause damage than a loose one. For...

Posted by on in Brakes
The weekend I turned my attention to getting the rear brakes sorted out. The new backing plates and hub centres finally arrived from the states and so I could fit them up and check out clearances and offsets. After trial fitting the hubs and taking some measurements I finally conceded that the current wheels are not going to work without some major modifications to both the front and rear ends, which is something that I am currently trying to avoid given that I am trying to meet a September deadline. The offset of my current wheels (ET30) puts the rim too far outwards and the result is that the tyres do not sit inside the arches, not a look that I personally like. Originally Type 3's are fitted with an ET46 wheel, but most wheels popular in the VW scene are in the ET25-35 range. Whilst this can be made to...

Posted by on in Brakes
This weekend I turned my attention to getting the rest of the brakes installed. The pedal assembly needed to be fitted and the SACO hydraulic clutch kit installed. The SACO kit replaces the clutch cable with a hydraulic setup which includes a small master cylinder that locates inside of the 'transmission' tunnel, and a slave cylinder that mounts where the stock clutch cable normally mounts. The first thing to do was to locate all of the separate parts of the pedal assembly so that I could trial fit everything together on the bench. I had previously completely removed and disassembled  the pedal assembly as I had the pedal arms chromed. After rounding up all of the parts I set about refitting the pedal assembly together. The were some components that were still a bit dirty as they had not been cleaned up, so I degreased them and repainted them where necessary....

Posted by on in engine overhaul
After some downtime troubleshooting my floor jack I got the engine out and stripped down, though I left a few things in place that shouldn't be in the way just to make reassembly go faster. Dropped it off this morning with the builder so he can look into what's causing the leak at #2. The oil was clearly coming from the mating surface between the top of the cylinder and the head. We shall see what's up. In the meantime I've sourced most of the gaskets and other expendable parts I'll need for reassembly from Bill & Steve's, and next I'll tend to some of the surface rust that's formed on a few parts over the last few years of storage. Rust never sleeps, as Neil Young has helpfully pointed out....

Posted by on in Uncategorized
I finally finished off the engine mounts today. I decided to bolt them in rather than weld them in, mostly as I feel that it will be a lot stronger. To do this I fabricated a plate to fit on the inside of the engine bay tin. This helps spread the load out and reinforce the panel. It will also prevent the bolts from pulling through the metal. The plate needed to be bent to miss the recess pressed in the panel where the bracket sits, which was easy enough to do on the bender. I then spotted through some holes to allow them to be bolted together. With the backing plates fabbed up it was time for a trial fit. I removed the engine bar and cleaned up the gunk and gunge from it (the donor engine had leaky oil cooler seals) I then bent the bar slightly rearwards on...

Posted by on in engine overhaul
I got the Ghia started again for the first time since 2007 but there was a significant oil leak almost immediately, coming from where cylinder #2 meets the head. Lots of oil and oil smoke. The rings on that piston are clearly not doing the job, but even so, oil shouldn't be leaking from there. The shop that assembled it suggested that I try running it until the rings seat themselves, but after running it for more than and hour at a time over several days at medium revs without load to help break it in, and then driving it for over ten miles today, the same symptoms remain. The engine has to come back out so we can pull the head and find out what went wrong. The good news is that I got to drive it again for the first time in four years. Aside from the ring issue...